Papers

Full-text versions of my published papers are available here by clicking on their titles. If you are interested in having a paper of your own hosted on this page, please contact me at john.peachman@gmail.com.

Published Papers

  1. Previously Unrecorded Verbal Parallels Between Histriomastix and The Acknowledged Works of John Marston (Notes and Queries, September 2004). In my first published paper, I discussed verbal parallels between Histriomastix and other works by  John Marston that support his authorship of Histriomastix. The paper is not relevant to Guy (as far as I know!), and is included here for completeness only.
  2. Links between Mucedorus and The Tragical History, Admirable Atchievments and Various Events of Guy Earl of Warwick (Notes and Queries, December 2006). This was my first published paper discussing Guy. I noted links between Guy and Mucedorus that support the contention that Sparrow is a satire on Shakespeare.
  3. Why A Dog? A Late Date For The Two Gentlemen Of Verona (Notes and Queries, September 2007). In this paper I put forward the radical hypothesis that Lance and his dog Crab in The Two Gentlemen Of Verona are a satire on Nashe and Jonson's involvement in the Isle of Dogs affair, with the corollary that the date of Two Gentlemen was much later than previously thought, probably in late 1597 or early 1598. Although the paper makes no mention of Guy, it is essential background reading for my follow-up paper, Ben Jonson's 'Villanous Guy'.
  4. Ben Jonson's 'Villanous Guy' (Notes and Queries, December 2009). In this follow-up paper to Why A Dog?, I argued that the clown Sparrow in Guy is Ben Jonson's satirical response to Shakespeare's original satire on Jonson in Two Gentlemen, and that Thomas Dekker alludes to this in Satiromastix.
Citations

  1. Previously Unrecorded Verbal Parallels Between Histriomastix and The Acknowledged Works of John Marston has been cited in The War of the Theatres and the Virtues of Conjecture (Chapter 1 of Marston, Rivalry, Rapprochement, and Jonson by Charles Cathcart), and in The Disguised Ruler in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries by Kevin A. Quarmby. It was also reviewed in The Year's Work in English Studies: Renaissance Drama excluding Shakespeare (2006).
  2. Links between Mucedorus and The Tragical History, Admirable Atchievments and Various Events of Guy Earl of Warwick has been cited in Guy as Early Modern English Hero by Helen Cooper (essay in Guy of Warwick: Icon and Ancestor), in Guy of Warwick, Godfrey of Bouillon, and Elizabethan Repertory, Early Theatre 12.2 (2009) by Annaliese Connolly, and in Shakespeare, Guy of Warwick, and Chines of Beef by Katherine Duncan-Jones.
  3. Why A Dog? was reviewed by Gabriel Egan in The Year's Work in English Studies: Shakespeare (2009). You can read his full review here. Kurt Schlueter cites Why A Dog? in his 2012 update of his New Cambridge Shakespeare edition of The Two Gentlemen of Verona. He notes that “With the exception of John Peachman, who argues that The Two Gentlemen was finished in late 1597 or early 1598, in the aftermath of the suppression of Thomas Nashe and Ben Jonson’s lost satiric play The Isle of Dogs, scholars have continued to support a composition date in the early 1590s, or even the late 1580s.”